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Print Mistress now at The Flock

High excitement in the studio last week as I printed fabric to be made into cushions for the fabulous THE FLOCK, an inspiringly curated shop in Christchurch’s new Tannery complex.

My heart burst with pride as I wrapped up the order and sent the cushions on their way to sit alongside a beautifully designed range of wares. Here are some pictures of the printing journey.

Jen (aka Print Mistress)

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Carefully cutting the linen/cotton blend fabric. The colour is  aptly named “flax”.

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Filling the screen with ink.

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‘First pull’ of Waterlines screen.

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Sun streaming into the studio onto the Mountain Heights print on pink cotton drill.

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Waterlines print hangs to dry in the studio.

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…then through the dryer which makes the ink colour-fast. (So the print won’t wash out)

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Pink Mountain Heights cushions filled with their cotton-covered feather inners ready to go.

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The waterlines print is backed with black 100% linen and finished with invisible zips.

 

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Print Mistress goes au natural

The Print Mistress studio hosted a fabulous workshop run by Jo Kinross. Jo introduced me to the wonderful world of Natural Eco Dyeing. This the start of a beautiful thing. I hope to experiment and use natural dyes in my work.    Jen (aka Print Mistress)

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Ingredients assembled in the morning ready to go.

Banksia rose cuttings in the iron pot. Loving the witch’s cauldron effect.

Silk scarf design in the making. Interesting change for me to have no idea of the outcome while designing a pattern.

Wrapping up our scarves with string to secure them for the “cooking”.

Our bundles simmering in the pot.

Out of the pot ready for the unwrapping with excitement and anticipation mounting.

Amazed at the results. Almost always the leaves have produced an entirely different colour to the leaf itself.

Helping hands keen to reveal the results.

Rusty nails make an excellent black.

Shibori technique used here. We folded silk and used wooden pegs that resisted the dye. The banksia rose clippings in the iron pot have given the fabric a wonderful smokey grey.

 

 

 

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Tokyo, A Designer’s Paradise

Tokyo was everything I hoped it would be and more. Extreme popular culture eye candy next to zen-like calm. A city of beautiful objects and fanatical attention to detail. Here are a few snapshots of this inspiring visit.
Jen (aka Print Mistress)

In Harajuku, you are always being watched from above.

Love that the firemen have such at perfect symbol to look for when searching for water.

The Okura Hotel lobby is the most beautiful room imaginable. A wonderful hotel seemingly unchanged since its creation in 1962.

The Hotel Okura lobby is the most beautiful room imaginable. A wonderful hotel seemingly unchanged since its creation in 1962.

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So often the craftsperson was acknowledged at a retail level. I love this portrait of the maker with his product.

A trip highlight was visiting a mall in Nakano, preserved from the 1970′s. Wonderful to be shown such a gem by Tokyo local Jared Braiterman. A Design anthropologist and prolific photographer. Check out Tokyo Greenspace.

Crazy babies in glass cabinet – Nakano Mall.

Particularly enjoying the long blonde hairstyles – Nakano Mall.

Glorious Harajuku provided many fabulous fashion opportunities.

If I was teenage Japanese girl I might look a bit like this.

Photo booths seemed to be e a popular destination for the young. This photo was taken in a big space filled with about 20 different photo booths.

Photo booths seemed to be a popular destination for the young. This photo was taken in a big space filled with about 20 different photo booths.

Pots of green outside Postalco. Simply beautiful stationery & bags. Never would have found this without the Herb Lester’s Tokyo guide.

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